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20110301
20110331
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their involvement, allowing for no troops on the ground. the libyan story, japan story, and the budget situation at home. the continuing resolution that punts the decisions on the budget until the beginning of april. they left town this friday morning. we would like to hear which of these stories are most important to you this friday morning. let's begin with a call from san antonio, texas. robert on the independent line. caller: am i on? good morning. i wanted to say that the most significant story i believe is what is happening in the middle east with all of these uprisings and the people wanting democracy. i find it very significant, even though all of these things are happening across the world like japan, i find this very significant because even though america has not intervened with these countries to try to make than democracies, they themselves have tried to make themselves free of dictators and other powers that they did not have control of. host: robert, what do you think of this particular instance with the united nations out suggesting military force is appropriate in libya? caller:
would not be able to handle a nuclear emergency similar to the events unfoiledding in japan. however, administrator craig fugate told a senate committee yesterday the government as a whole is better prepared to deal with emergencies than it was before hurricane katrina. also testifying, the former inspector general who assessed fema operations since the hurricane. this is about two hours. >> the hearing will come to order. i thank everyone for their patience. as you know we had two votes on the floor. so we delayed the start of the hearing. i welcome, everyone. we convene this hearing which had been long-planned, long-scheduled on fema's ability to respond to a major catastrophe against the compelling backdrop of the tragically catastrophic events unfolding in japan. an earthquake and tsunami in rapid succession that have already resulted in twice as many deaths as al qaeda's attack on america on 9/11. of course no one believes that the death, and finding of the dead is over yet. the earthquake and tsunami have also caused fires and explosions at nuclear power plants that could have
countries? if there is any other country i would move to, it would be japan because they are such a great country. i want to say that we do not need to by our friends via financial aid. this is ridiculous. host: we do not need to by our friends. guest: is a matter of developing or alliances, working together in the interest of the united states of america. in haiti, when there is poverty and people do not have homes or a place to live, it is not a matter of buying our friends but to make sure we can bring stability in the country because they are right on our border. the same thing with mexico. people travel everywhere and we are all interconnected. i hope that in addition to suppor >> in about 20 minutes we will take you live to the white house for a news conference with president obama. among the possible topics, libya and the impact of the sue tsunan the west coast. live coverage when it starts, scheduled now for 12:30 eastern, and can we'll have that here on c-span2. a new member of congress, kevin yoder, a freshman representative from kansas who also sits on the gop's appropriations
also non-governmental organizations, look at the regulatory commissions. i think japan is quite a democratic country. it will take awhile to get all the information out of it. in this country, active citizen participation -- go to nuclear regulatory commission hearings. you can comment on all kinds of things. i recently commented on an n.r.c. regulations and rules. it is possible, but i think you have to be vigilant. host: grace writes to us on twitter asking about a ban on nuclear power plants. sharon squassoni, thank you so much for joining us this morning. she is the program director for proliferation prevention at the center for strategic & international studies. let's go now to the floor of the house of representatives, where the session is getting underway. thanks for joining us today. ker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., march 16, 2011. i hereby appoint the honorable renee ellmers to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of janua
candidate. he talked about the pentagon budget and japan's nuclear power crisis. this was hosted by the ideal love republican party in davenport. it's 25 minutes. >> thank you very much. congratulations on this. it happened i got to speak at the first state party event at the chairman some of you may remember in july and in 2009 with the rising stars. the great event, read energy, great fun, and i told people at home he is going to be first-rate chairman. i picked up the three, and a former county chairmen. i was the county chairmen in my county twice, once for four years and once for six years and i'm going to just tell you this is where the elections were won. they were here where the rubber meets the road. >> judy, thank you for the work that you do. [applause] >> i would be here on march 15th, but i not going to have anybody to stand behind me. >> i'm really glad to be here for the kickoff the series speaker event because we are getting ready for something very important. the 2012 election is going to be a watershed election in american history. matt didn't go into all of my
an impression, barbara, about how news of japan sinks into one of the most seismically active country in the world? it's a good question. a lot of my iranian friends have been very afraid about the brashear. -- brashear reactor. i had one friend tell me it's such a hodgepodge of technology. the germans started it in the 1970's and you have chinese bits, russian bits that they're afraid if you plug it in you're afraid the whole thing's beginning to to blow up anyway. now you have japan. it's a very cautionary tale for the iranians. you notice brashear as that -- has not opened. i would bet that it's going to be a while before that reactor starts up if it ever does and if they don't have a functioning nuclear power plant, why do they need all these lower enriched uniform for? -- uranium for? that's in favor as well as all the other problems that's going on, the assassinations of nuclear scientists and so on. it definitely could be a factor in suggesting that they might slow down. i don't think they're going to give up their determination to have a pro
aspiration of the iranians for a long time. do you had the impression, barbara, how news of japan at that didn't one of the most seismically active countries in the world? >> a lot my iranian friends have been wary of the it bashir reactor opening. the german started in the 1970's, and you have chinese and russians, but if you plug it into the whole thing will blow up anyway. and now you have had japan. it is a very cautionary tale for the iranians. bashir has not opened. there were problems with the fuel rods, some say sabotage of the pumps. i think it will be awhile before the reactor starts up, if it ever does. if they do not have a functioning power plant, what did they mine all of the -- in range all the or uranium for? -- what did dave enrich all of the uranium for? it could be a factor in projecting that they might slow down. i do not think they will give up their determination on those who have a program and to say that they have a right to the program. that as a nationalistic issue. they will not go away. >> that is a lesson not just for iran but for the entire middle eas
caused by the catastrophe there. it is something that japan with assistance from the world committee can achieve. it is important to recognize that we come into this challenge in the world economy in a much stronger position that we have been. you see much more confidence, i think testified here and around the world, and the resilience in the process of expansion we see under way. we want to sustain that. and they should be our focus and attention. >> i am concerned because we see toshiba and toyota stopping production. illus like we have a systemic shortage of power in japan that will cripple large publicly traded companies in being able to maintain production. >> again, there are a lot of things to be concerned about in the world. it is important that we watch this carefully. very hard to judge at this stage what will be the magnitude of the short-term cost of production output there. our focus will be on trying to help them make sure they can help meet the humanitarian challenge in the reconstruction challenge. i think it can be reasonably confident they will be able to do that. >> se
afghanistan by the end of the year. follow the house live, here on c-span. >> earlier today, japan's prime minister called the damage from the earthquake the most severe challenge the nation has faced since world war ii. friday's disasters damage a series of nuclear reactors, particularly -- potentially sending one to a personal -- a partial meltdown. this statement is about 10 minutes. >> i would like to express my deepest sympathy to those who have been affected by the quake, and also in the disaster stricken areas, as well as to the people of japan who are in a very difficult situation. people remain very calm, and i would like to express my deepest gratitude as well as my respect to all those who are behaving very calmly. boeing yesterday, today we worked very hard to rescue people, and so far, the self- defense force as well as police and firefighters and maritime are able to save about 12,000 people. i would like to explain about the rescue efforts. the self-defense forces, all of the forces have mobilized 50,000 people, and they are to be doubled to 100,000, and the police officers,
on the i live like to do offer my sincere condolences to the people of japan as they recover from one of the first national disasters in their history. japan has been a stalwart partner in afghanistan, an important contributor to the nation there. >> if i could interrupt you for a minute. thank you for doing that. >> thank you. it is the assessment that the momentum achieved by the taller than it since 2005 has been arrested and much of the country and reversed in a number of areas. it is also fragile and reversible. it is clear that much difficult work lies ahead with our partners to solidify and expand our games in the spring offensive. the achievements in 2013 -- in 2010 have allowed the joint nato -- the achievements are also very important. i've prepared to provide recommendations to president obama for commencement of the drawdown of the u.s. search forces in july. it has put us on the right path. afghan forces are in the lead by the end of 2014. bin smmit. the achievements of 2010 and early 2011 have been enabled by a determined effort to get the inputs right united states and
to take resources away from that to help the effort to analyze what happened in japan the decisions on the new reactors are still some time away. right now they're getting public comment. that will take a few months to get all of those comments in. then we will begin the process of reviewing them. that is still several months away. i am not sure exactly how we will balance our resources. mother nature has thrown a hideous tons of the japanese, bigger than their civil a nuclear engineers and licensing authority's anticipated. how can we be confident -- not that we are likely to say tsunami -- how can we be confident that we won't have a hurricane, earthquake and other natural phenomenon that is bigger than the biggest thing you have budgeted for it? guest: the way we think about it is we come up with what we think is the maximum natural phenomenon that we expect to occur and we designed these facilities around that with a little bit extra margin because we now there are some things we don't know. we recognize there may things we had not envisioned or thought about. we have establishe
an argument. >> that's a good point, that's a good point. you have recently come back from a trip to japan. we are now here in washington talking as we tape this. but you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas, and you have done a lot of that. what i am trying to understand is, in a way, why did you make that trip? if you answer "because it was a great story," is not enough. why did you make the trip? you have so many responsibilities that come into a decision. why, for example, did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say is a science and a theory. it is not. a lot of it is i feel impelled to go. it is not just that i cover that tsunami in indonesia and east asia, but i felt that that was the story that i had to experience tangibly, and to see. as we said, this incredible constellation of the disasters. i felt at the time, at that moment, too, that there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there, and part of being an anchor, as you know, is a decision about where are you best there anchoring. is and it -- isn't it don hewitt who coined this term, "anchor"? a
major contributors. japan for example, provides the salaries for afghan police. there is another fund to which nato-isaf countries contribute, but again it is the afghan secret forces fund that is without question. >> does that 20-24% cut which i believe is in the c.r. and h.r.-1, how does that affect its? >> when that hits, and again, we project that that would hit perhaps sometime in june, that would have an enormous affect, a negative effect on our effort, needless to say. and it would undermine, it would undercut our efforts to develop the enablers. because again, we've always had a progression that first you develop the guys that can help you in the fight, actually out there against the insurgents. and gradually build institutions, the ministries, the branch schools, leader developer courses. by the way, literacy programs have featured very probably now. we finally bit the program -- bit the bullet. with basic training we also do basic literacy now and we're way over 100,000 that have been either train or in the process. >> can you provide a timeline then? getting the independenc
additional sanctions, the european union has additional sanctions, other countries like japan, korea, etc., have added on sanctions, to get some of our partners to follow sanctions that are not u.n. sanctions has been challenging. but we are at it every single day and we will keep it up. there will be more to report to you in the near future. >> thank you for that. i just hope that you can submit for the record how many are under review and what is the 180-day tolling period look like. >> thank you. >> good morning, madame. >> good morning. >> i want to talk with you about the national debt. in is a national issue an regards to national security. how does it affect our ability to affect events around the world? >> i think it is an incredibly important issue. i clearly agree that the united states must be strong at home in order to maintain our strength abroad. at the core of our strength is our economic strength. i am well aware, having sat for you and know sitting for eight years, the necessity to take action to begin to rein in our debt and, particularly, our indebtedness to foreign cou
to the people of japan, as they work to recover from one of the worst natural disasters in their history. for many years now, japan has been a stall wart partner in afghanistan, an important contributor to the mission there. now our thoughts and our prayers are with our long-time allies and with all those in japan effected by the earthquake and tsunami. >> i can say i believe every person on the committee and every american as well. thank you for doing that. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> as a bottom line up front, it is isaf's assessment that the momentum achieved by the taliban since 2005 has been arrested inch of the country and reversed in a number of important areas. however, while the security progress achieved over the past year is significant, it is also tragedy i will and reversible. moreover, it is clear that much difficult work lies ahead with our afghan partners to solidify and expand our gains in the face of the expected taliban spring offensive. nonetheless, the hard fought achievements in 2010 and early 2011 have enabled the joint afghan nato transition board to recommend
of that decade. one thinks of japan where there was no return of growth until the beginning of this decade. how could you possibly attribute to the government as you do? >> i'm grateful for the honorable gentleman's point we have argued consistently and so has the international community that we had a financial crisis from 2008 and 2009. and out of that crisis without making references to tsunamis and earthquakes there are many after-shocks and it takes much time to actually get over that. so i certainly agree with that point. but it was not us who said that we were going to raise growth in last year. it was the conservative government. and the honorable member from chichester when he pointed out that under a labour government we had 40% debt in relation to gross domestic product. my recollection in some years it was 37%. it was the financial crisis that pushed it up to where it was. >> i'm very grateful from my honorable friend giving way. would he also say that's particularly startling after all the motions we've heard from the chancellor and the budget, the growth forecast is actually after
and japan's statistics, they are lower than ours. if any, these are optimistic figures. >> that is exactly right. japan as you probably all know has a birthrate not of 2.0, but more like 1.25. their population, i think, is about in 2005 has been declining even though people are living so much longer. their population is declining and they have essentially no net immigration, so we are still having at least essentially replacement birthrates and having net immigration so good point. our problem is significant, but it's actually worse eel where, so -- elsewhere, so if that's solace, that's real good news. again, if you look at the birthrate at 2.0, add in the net immigration, it makes the equivalent of 2.3. that means while the birthrate dropped from about 3 down to 2 with the help of immigration it's 2.3. it's not quite as bad as just looking at birth rates, but it's still very, very significant. now, the imp nations of all of this -- implications on all of this in social security and beyond social security currently, we can look at what has happened to the relationship between the number o
, russia, west europe, and japan and turkey. they preface pages xv to 17 spells out the inputs that the task force had. sometimes brilliant background papers in the end of the report, and particularly one just published on women in afghanistan on the perspective of somebody who was under cover trying to maintain women's schools during taliban rule in their country. with background meetings in a dozen capitols, including a meeting with afghan on all sides from senior officials to the kabul government to the political opposition within that political system to civil society to, yes, persons intimately linked to the insurgency. and we at century, my colleague michael hannah and we provided the kind of support that handwriting what was being told to us by the wisdom of those task force members. they set the course and it's to them that we now turn to outline to you our groups recommendations and findings. so tom? >> thank you very much, jeff, for your very kind introduction and for your setting the stage. i begin by saying the reports findings with the wildly varying were unanimous
. japan. turkey, a special and interesting possibility given its role in the region and its current involvement in afghanistan. perhaps saudi arabia and perhaps others. we are not prescriptive with respect to that. their role would be initially to work closely with the facilitator to help in fact cement ties and bring forward the kind of agreements that are absolutely necessary to see the inner afghan part of the process prosper. the their second role and it will evolve in our view over time to also consult together and negotiate to undertake hollen what with the international community and particularly the region will support what is that the afghans can agree, support what the afghans would like with result -- respect to their future status in the region and the world, is it neutrality or something else? also make commitments themselves on critical questions regarding the future of afghanistan. centrally continued economic assistance and wherever required in the future of the government, security and assistance to help against any of surgeons -- resurgence of al qaeda. as well as
in japan. i have one friend tell me that there's such a hodgepodge of technology. the germans started it in the 1970's. then the japanese took it. they are afraid that if people give in, it will blow up. -- they're afraid that, if you plug it in, it will blow up. some people have suggested there is seven times at the pumps. i think there will be a while because that reactor dissolves if it ever does. if they do not have a power plant, what they need this and richard uranium for? the other things that have gone the assassinations of nuclear scientists as so on, it definitely could be a factor in suggesting that they might slowdown. i do not think that they will give up their determination to have a program meant to say that they have a right to the program. that is a nationalistic issue. that will let go away. >> that is a lesson not just for the iran, but for the entire middle east. >> it could really be a counter- proliferation -- if it is a horrible cause for the japanese, but it is important for all of the the country to want nuclear power. >> with afghanistan being a majority pest
is the highest with about 38%. i think only japan is higher. it is all put this on an impact. will you comment on that? >> you are correct. our tax rate look soon to be the highest. ia good tax code would have a broad base. this speciallot deductions and extensions. by getting a broad base coming you can lower the rate. that provides greater incentives for firms to locate. do you tax based only on profits earned in the united states are blow for profit? but at what rate to you think we should aim for that would put this in the best position in terms of competition on the global stage? >> i did not have a single number in mind. there are is the number of deductio. we will certainly get it down if we can. >> part of the charges to keep prices stable. on the one hand, we have to pay down the debt. to what is this a faulted the economy? it is still volatil or week. athere is a $1 billion cut we passed around. why is the discrepancy in the figure of around 6005000 to 700? that is a huge difference. who doou believe here? we have a number of questions. we are trying to understand the reasons. >> wou
force trust fund and there are other mechanisms, as well. japan, as an example funds the salaries of the national police, a very significant contribution. so continuing that and increasing that is hugely important. the very high levels of afghan national security force funding right now are, of course, necessary because we're building them. and it requires the infrastructure equipment, in some cases various contract trainers and other contract assistance. these are the big cost drivers, actually, not salaries per se. so once the infrastructure is built and then it is in the sustainment mode rather than the construction mode, costs will come down. obviously as equipment has procured. the element of that cost will come down. as afghan trainers take over for contract trains, that cost will come down. it will still be considerable. and secretary gates talked about that. and certainly over time, afghanistan itself as it is able, again, to exploit its extraordinary mineral blessings, the trillions with an "s" on the end of it of dollars. as they are able to extract and get those to mark
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